<< Major Pain Double Asymmetries From the Real World >>

Denying Entries

Q 2
4 3
Q 9 7 5 4 2
8 6 2
J 8 5 3
10 6 5
A 3
9 7 4 3
 
A 10 7 6 4
K 8 7
10 8 6
10 5
K 9
A Q J 9 2
K J
A K Q J

Hearts

South makes 4 .

Diamonds

If South declares 5 , West leads a spade. If North plays the Q, East wins the ace and exits a spade. Declarer still has to lose the A, so he can't afford to play the clubs or hearts from her hand, so she must attack diamonds. West wins the first diamond, and returns a diamond, reaching this position:
4 3
Q 9 7 5
8 6 2
J 8
10 6 5
9 7 4 3
 
10 7 6
K 8 7
10
10 5
A Q J 9 2
A K Q J
South is stuck in his hand, and East must score another trick.
If North is declaring, East can't lead spades and keep North from winning the Q to take the heart finesse. So say East leads a diamond to West's ace, and West continues a diamond.
South plays two rounds of clubs followed by the K. East must duck to avoid giving North an entry. Then South plays a low spade to the queen, and East wins his ace, leading to:
4 3
Q 9 7 5
8
J 8
10 6 5
9 7
 
10 7 6
K 8 7
10
A Q J 9 2
A K
With East on lead, he must yield an entry to the North, or let South finesse hearts, take the heart ace, and ruff a heart to draw trumps and claim. Either way, declare ends up with 11 tricks.
<< Major Pain
Thomas Andrews (bridge@thomasoandrews.com), © 2000-2009.
From the Real World >>
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