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More Trump Magic

K Q 6 4
Q 8
9 8 4 2
9 5 4
J 7 5
A 7 6 4
Q 5
K Q J 3
 
10 9 8 2
9 5 2
A K J 7
6 2
A 3
K J 10 3
10 6 3
A 10 8 7

Notrump

If East/West are on lead, they can set up two clubs, and have four diamonds, two clubs, and the A.
If North/South are on lead, they can set up three hearts, and have three spades, three hearts, and a club.

Spades

If East/West are on lead, they can take three top diamonds (West pitching a heart) and on the fourth diamond promotes a trump trick. If South ruffs low, West overruffs and sets up a pair of club tricks. So South must ruff high, and West pitches a heart. When West attacks hearts, West wins the second round and exits a high club to this position:
K Q 6 4
9 5
J 7 5
Q J 3
 
10 9 8 2
9
6
3
K J
10 8 7
Now if South tries to pitch a club loser from dummy on a heart, West ruffs high without costing the defense a trump trick.
And declarer can't afford to draw two rounds of trumps before attacking hearts for the same reason. And if declarer plays two top spades and exits a spade, the defense gets to attack clubs before the heart ace is knocked out.
The play of the fourth diamond is similar to the end position from Trump Magic. The lead functions as both a trump promotion and an entry killer.
If North/South are on lead against spades, they draw three rounds of spades immediately and then set up hearts. North/South have the club ace, three hearts, and three spades. (If East ruffs the third heart winner, then North simply gets another trump.)

Hearts

If North/South are on lead, they attack trumps immediately. When West wins and they take four top diamonds, South pitches a club. North/South eventually get three hearts, three spades, and a club.
If East/West are on lead, they take three diamonds (West pitching a spade) and then attack clubs.

Diamonds

If East/West are on lead, they draw trumps, then lead clubs. They score two clubs, four diamonds and a heart.
If North/South are on lead, the defense starts with three spades (South pitching a club) followed by the Q lead. This kills an entry to the West hand for setting up clubs two club tricks. To preserve his other entry, the diamond queen, the defense cannot draw trumps. West must win the second heart lead, and start with high clubs. South wins the first one, and plays two rounds of high hearts, North pitching clubs. North/South have taken three spades, two hearts and a club, so East must ruff the fourth round of hearts, at which point North must score a long trump.

Clubs

If North/South are on lead against clubs, they take three top spades, South pitching a diamond. At this point, North can lead anything and the contract is set, but the direct route is hearts, starting the queen. West wins the second heart and the defense runs two diamonds getting to this position:
6
9 8
9 5 4
7 6
K Q J 3
 
10
9
K J
6 2
J 10
A 10 8 7
Declarer has taken three spades, and one heart. He has an obvious club and additional heart, but he can also always score a second club with a heart ruff high in dummy - East's weak doubleton can't overruff the club nine.
If East/West are on defense, they start with four diamonds (West pitching a spade on the third round.) South can't pitch on the fourth diamond, because the defense has two clubs and a heart absolutely, so South has to ruff low, West pitching a second spade, leading to:
K Q 6 4
Q 8
9 5 4
J
A 7 6 4
K Q J 3
 
10 9 8 2
9 5 2
6 2
A 3
K J 10 3
A 10 8
Nothing declarer does here can keep West from scoring three club tricks - he cannot be endplayed, and if he ever ruffs a spade with the 3 it's all obvious.
<< A First Example
Thomas Andrews (bridge@thomasoandrews.com), © 1999-2014.
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