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Another Three-suited Squeeze

Submitted by Forrest Smith

North Deals
Both Vul
IMPs
From: OKbridge
A K 9 7
Q 8 2
3 2
A K Q J
J 10 5 4 2
J 10
K Q 9 5
8 5
 
Q 8 3
K 9 4 3
J 4
10 6 4 3
6
A 7 6 5
A 10 8 7 6
9 7 2
West North East South
1 Pass 1
Pass 2 Pass 2 NT
Pass 3 Pass 3 NT
All Pass

West lead the 4, and East won the queen when declarer played low from dummy.
Clearly, from East's point of view, continuing spades wasn't much help, so he shifted to the 4. Declarer ducked, West won the 9, and continued with the 5 to East's jack, declarer ducking again.
East got out with a safe club, and declarer ran his club tricks. West pitched a spade on the third club, but at the fourth club, West was in a bind:
A K 9
Q 8 2
J
J 10 5
J 10
K Q
 
Q 8
K 9 4 3
10
A 7 6 5
A 10 8
Declarer has won four tricks and has four more top tricks. If West pitches a diamond, declarer gets another diamond trick. If West pitches a spade, declarer gets another spade trick. So West is forced to pitch the 10.
This pitch allows declarer to cash the top spades, pitching another diamond and a heart, then lead the Q. East is forced to cover, and West's J is pinned. Declarer can either duck, leaving East endplayed in hearts, or win. Either way, South can set up a second heart trick.
This line was found while we were kibbitzing double-dummy. Is there any reason to take this line rather than simply playing for the 3-3 diamond split? I don't think so.
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Thomas Andrews (bridge@thomasoandrews.com), © 1995-2009.
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