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Wrong-sided

10 9 3 2
A 2
A 10 8 4
A K 3
K J 8 6 5
8 6
Q 9 7 6
10 7
 
4
J 10 9 3
5 3 2
J 9 8 4 2
A Q 7
K Q 7 5 4
K J
Q 6 5
I'll leave it to the reader to determine why 6 , 6 , and 6 NT fail.
It's rather surprising that 6 makes on this deal, if declared by South. West should lead a heart or club, won in the North hand. Declarer plays K and J, and, whether West covers or not, is left with a tenace over West in the trump suit. Declarer then takes dummy's club and heart winners, and crosses with a small heart to hand:
10 9 3 2
A 10
3
K J 8 6 5
Q 9
 
4
J 10
5
J 9 8
A Q 7
Q 7 5
Q
On a low heart from the South hand, West cannot profit from ruffing, so West pitches a spade. Declarer ruffs and plays the diamond ace, pitching a spade. Finally, declarer leads a club off dummy, and West is caught:
10 9 3 2
3
K J 8 6
Q
 
4
J
J 9 8
A Q
Q 7
Q
This is essentially the end position we've seen twice before. If West ruffs, he is forced to lead from the spades. If he pitches, declarer just runs his hearts, and West is still forced to pitch spades. In the end, all West scores is his one trump trick.
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Thomas Andrews (bridge@thomasoandrews.com), © 1999-2014.
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